richard.adeney@sky.com

Wye Tenkara

Upper Longtown Beat River Monnow

Upper Longtown beat of the river Monnow

Mail black small Pinterest red small

Furled verses fluorocarbon Tenkara leaders

By richard adeney, Jan 18 2018 07:10PM

Traditionally tenkara and other fixed line fishing methods lines were made from horse hair, cotton or other suitable material. The lines were furled so that they could be made into a suitable length for fishing with. Today furled tenkara leaders are made from synthetic thread such as uni-thread. What if any, are the advantages of using a furled leader over using a level fluorocarbon leader?


I feel that there are the following advantages over level fluorocarbon leaders.


1. The lines are suppler so cast better and this will enhance the presentation of the fly.

2. It is possible to create tapered lines, which improves casting particularly when fishing in tight spaces.

3. The lines have no memory so do not need to be stretched before unlike fluorocarbon lines.

4. Take indicators can be built into the line.

5. The materials used to make furled tenkara lines may be more environmentally friendly than fluorocarbon lines because fluorocarbon does not have a good environmental profile.


There are some disadvantages to using a furled tenkara line and they are:


1. Furled lines are a fixed length whereas a fluorocarbon line can be cut to the required length. If a fluorocarbon leader is too long it can be easily trimmed to size. It is not possible change the length of a furled leader.

2. Furled leaders need to be greased if they are to float as does a fluorocarbon leader.

3. Furled leaders may not hang as straight as a fluorocarbon leader from the rod tip.

4. Furled leaders can wet and there may be fine droplets of water shed when cast. This may frighten spooky fish.


On balance I think there are more advantages of using a furled leader than using a fluorocarbon leader.


Add a comment
* Required

Blog

Welcome to my blog

 

This blog will contain my thoughts on fishing the small streams in Herefordshire.

RSS Feed

Web feed